Vegan Lifestyle at Home; The Experts Tell Us How to Do It

Choosing a vegan lifestyle is not only about your dietary preferences; committing yourself to a genuinely vegan and cruelty-free lifestyle extends to all other areas of your life, from beauty and personal care products, fashion items like shoes, bags, and clothes, cleaning supplies for the home, furniture and home decór, since animal products happen to be found in a number of things you may not even imagine, and even when products can be vegan, which means that they don’t contain animal products, they may have been tested on animals, which is why it’s important to go for cruelty-free options as well.

If you want to know more about the basics of how to go vegan and have a truly committed vegan and cruelty-free lifestyle at home, keep reading to learn what the experts told us. 

 As a new vegan, what are the staple foods that should never be missed in your pantry?

Nutritional Yeast – Fortified nutritional yeast is an essential vegan pantry staple making sure you get enough vitamin B-12, naturally found in meat. Often referred to as ‘nooch,’ it can be an acquired taste that adds umami and ‘cheesy’ flavor to your meal. It can be stirred into recipes towards the end of cooking. Or try sprinkling it over the top of pizza, salads, soups, pasta dishes, etc. I recommend starting with a small amount, adding more as you get used to this savory ingredient.

Cashews – When you’re looking for dairy alternatives, raw cashews work wonders in everything from vegan mac and cheese, vegan queso and alfredo, cashew ricotta, vegan cheesecake, vegan cream, and more. Those who are free of nut allergies will benefit from adding this versatile nut to your pantry. They blend up creamy smooth in seconds with a quick soak, and you will never miss dairy again!

Legumes – Whether dried or canned, stocking a variety of legumes such as lentils, beans, and peas is a must. They are extremely versatile and the main protein in a vegan diet. Not only are they inexpensive and extremely versatile, but legumes are also low in fat, high in protein and fiber. Plus, they carry essential micronutrients and phytochemicals to keep you at your best.

Spices – Although they are not really a food, having a good assortment of spices on hand will enhance your plant-based meal. I love the simplicity of simple salt and pepper, but spices and herbs can make all the difference and make your recipe come alive. I recommend sourcing the freshest dried spices and using fresh herbs whenever possible.

-Julie West from The Simple Veganista 

What kind of vegan options can we have at home as meat substitutes that provide the proteins required?

The first thing that people need to know is that most of us eat too much protein, and unless you are only eating vegan junk foods, the likelihood of you not getting enough protein is slim to none.

Please check out this video (from 2014) by Dr. Michael Gregor in which he answers the question: “Do vegetarians get enough protein?”. As he states in the video: The average requirement is 42 grams of protein a day. Non-vegetarians get way more than they need, and so does everyone else. On average, vegetarians and vegans get 70% more protein than they need every day. Dr. Gregor also has a great cookbook: The How Not to Diet Cookbook.

Another good online resource for vegan protein can be found in this Comprehensive Chart of Vegan Protein Sources

So – what vegan options can you eat at home?

  • Home-made bean burgers
  • Home-made veggie burgers
  • Tofu
  • Tempeh
  • Seitan
  • Grains
  • Nuts
  • Seeds
  • Non-dairy milks
  • Fruits and Vegetables – all contain protein

Store bought meat substitutes (burgers, sausages, chorizo, deli slices, crumbles, etc.) from the following companies:

  • Tofurkey
  • Beyond Meat
  • LightLife
  • Impossible Foods
  • Field Roast
  • Sweet Earth
  • Morningstar Farms
  • Gardein
  • And so many more

And with so many vegan recipes available online, it’s easy to find exactly what you’re looking for. Hope this helps you on your journey to a more compassionate and healthier way of eating.

-Gita Devi from The Ginger Cat B&B

In your experience, what are the Do’s and Don’ts when someone starts to adopt a vegan lifestyle? 

“Taking the first step is always the hardest”, but becoming vegan has never been easier than it is right now. So many new options – buying food, dining out, clothes, personal care items, sources of information etc. Everything points to an easier lifestyle than ever before.

What can I eat? – Meat, milk products, eggs, seafood, it’s easy to think that your diet will be seriously limited, but this is simply not true. Most peoples’ diets are very limited by what they choose to base their meal options around. There are a vastly larger number of fruits and vegetable options to base your meals on than animal-based options. Also, for an easy transition, there are also a huge number of faux-products –  meat substitutes, dairy-free milks, cheeses, pastries, and ice-creams. You don’t have to forego your fave dishes because these days there are plant-based replicas. It’s just a case of finding the shops and outlets where you can buy them from.  And it’s the same with dining out – the hardest part is getting started. Once you familiarise yourself with the local vegan-friendly options, you will find that you can eat at most places, and maybe you just do should not want to support places that do not cater at all to vegans. If you find yourself really short of options, try Italian, Indian, Chinese restaurants – you can always find a few options in these places.

Important foods for vegans – everyone needs to consume essential minerals, vitamins, and other components to ensure optimal health, and vegans are no different. Thankfully a well-planned vegan diet lends itself very well to good health. Most dieticians recommend only a vitamin B12 supplement for vegans since modern living has stripped food of this essential item. However, often vegan-friendly milks, margarines, cheeses, yogurts, even cereals will be fortified with B12. Other vegans take vitamin D supplements if they live in less sunny climes. Yet others take fatty acid supplements, however, studies indicate that most people can synthesize what they need. But the truth is that everyone should follow a healthy diet and you might find that your own supplement requirements are different. You can find many recommended vegan nutritionists online to allay any concerns.

How to tolerate the talk – Being vegan can be very challenging, especially when it comes to the thoughts and reactions of non-vegans, whether they be friends, family, co-workers, or just people you meet. Chances are you will be ridiculed, warned about your health by self-appointed “health experts”, treated to attacks from home-spun irrational philosophers, even ostracised. And the crazy thing is that this is usually from the most ignorant.

The trick is to be prepared. Dealing with these issues is challenging at the start, but the more often you address them, the more confident you will become. You will soon recognize the most familiar lines and build up your own stock answers to them. Remember that science and philosophy are on your side. There are plenty of online resources to help you, including vegan Youtube channels. And try to adopt an engaging and positive approach wherever possible because you are now an advocate for doing the right thing.

Staying the course – Making the transition can appear daunting but do not despair; you are not alone. There are more like-minded vegans than you might imagine, wherever you live. “A problem shared is a problem halved”, so get involved in on-line vegan communities such as Facebook or forums, or join local vegan clubs. And if there isn’t one, start one!

-Sheldon Hey from Vegan SA 

What are the benefits of a vegan diet on our overall health?

In a socio-cultural and economic environment, with large-scale publicity aimed towards influencing the consumption of products and, as consequence, diets, we grow up with the idea that we need animal products such as meat and milk to achieve good health and, many times, social status. However, a strictly vegetarian diet is filled with all the nutrients our bodies need and is scientifically proved to be effective in keeping the body healthy at any stage of a human being’s life.

There are many studies that report the benefits of being vegan and following a plant-based diet. This kind of diet tends to offer more fibers, antioxidants, as well as being even richer in potassium, magnesium, and vitamins A, C, and E.

According to the American Heart Association, this type of diet is also effective at preventing cardiac diseases. A study was carried out by the association with 100 participants with pre-existing heart conditions to rate the performance of heart functions for patients with omnivorous and vegetarian diets. The vegetarian diet was shown to significantly reduce systemic inflammation and improved the lipid profiles for the patients, while this wasn’t the case for those with an omnivore diet.

Among other benefits of being vegan is the potential to reduce risks for some types of cancer. Regularly eating vegetables may reduce the risk of cancer by 9 to 18%. Among the cancers that we can reduce the chances of risk, we have prostate cancer, colon cancer, and breast cancer.

It can be observed that plant-based living is not only healthy and diverse but can also help us live better and longer.

-Alex Felipelli, Founder and CEO at Veggly 

How do you know when a beauty product is cruelty-free? What should we be looking for?

First, check to see if the beauty brand is listed on Leaping Bunny’s Cruelty-Free List or PETA’s Beauty Without Bunnies List. You can also check my cruelty-free brands list. If the brand is in either of these three spots, great! It’s easy to tell they’re cruelty-free.

If it is a smaller brand, such as an indie brand like Necromancy Cosmetica, Fyrinnae, or Sydney Grace Co, you’ll want to check their FAQ page or about page to see if they list their cruelty-free status. Most indie brands will be very transparent. Necromancy Cosmetica, for example, states that their lipsticks are made with 100% vegan materials that have never been tested on animals.

If a brand isn’t on Leaping Bunny’s, PETA’s, or my cruelty-free list, and they don’t have the details in their FAQ page, you’ll need to email them.

The questions I typically ask a new brand now are as follows: (these questions were created with my bestie Jen from My Beauty Bunny
1. Is your company certified by Leaping Bunny/CCIC?
2. Are the products vegetarian? (no animals killed for the products – i.e. some forms of collagen, squalane, etc.)
3. Are the products vegan? (i.e. product ingredients that come from animals like lanolin, honey, milk, etc.

  1. Are the finished products tested on animals by the company, a parent company, a third party or an affiliate company?
    5. Are the products tested on animals during the production process by the company, a parent company, a third party or an affiliate company?
    6. Do you have documents from your ingredient suppliers to show that they are not testing on animals for your brand or any other brand?
    7. Does your manufacturer purchase any ingredients from laboratories that conduct tests on animals? Do you have documents to support this?
    8. Are the products sold in any markets where animal testing is required by local law and regulations (China, etc)?
    9. If the products are sold in China, please explain how you are avoiding pre-market testing (are you aligned with PETA or Leaping Bunny)?

The information you’re looking for is whether or not the brand tests on animals or if the brand contracts out to their manufacturers/suppliers/a third-party vendor for animal testing.

-Courtney, founder of Phyrra

What kind of materials should we look to incorporate in our home to make it vegan and cruelty-free?

  • Decorative Pillows:“Covers made from linen, bamboo, and organic cotton are healthier alternatives to leather and wool. They are free from harmful chemicals, vegan, and super soft.”
  • Pillow Inserts:“Consider rubber, kapok, or buckwheat fill for your decorative pillows instead of foam. These fills, unlike foam, are completely organic and free from off-gassing (the harmful chemicals that foam releases). They are also vegan.”
  • Sofa Cushion Filling:“When a sofa, for example, is touted as faux, make sure you check the fill. The upholstery can be a faux leather or velvet. However, the foam cushions underneath can be wrapped in feathers or down.”
  • Comforters and Blankets:“How yummy to wrap yourself in a soft thick cotton, bamboo, or faux fur blanket. These are much healthier, kinder options that contain less chemicals than a wool or down-filled blanket.”
  • Rugs:“I’m a fan of cotton, hemp, jute, and sisal. They are affordable, organic, and have fewer chemicals than wool or silk rugs. Plus, there are endless styles and patterns that are non-animal based.”
  • Printed Fabrics:“Printed fabrics are beautiful and come in endless prices and styles. Try to find fabrics that use natural dyes that are either vegetable or water-based.”

– Deborah DiMare, founder of VeganDesign.Org

What tips can you give us to start a vegan lifestyle and actually stick to it?

Our Top 10 Tips to Get You Started

  1. It’s all in the planning! 

Don’t wake up on the first day of your vegan adventure without having thought about what you might eat! That is the absolute quickest way to fall off the wagon. Ahead of time, have a think about your first day’s meals and buy plant milk for your breakfast and coffee or tea, some dairy-free butter for toast or sandwiches, and something tasty for your dinner.

Some people find making a weekly meal planner helpful, so they always know what they need to shop for and what they will be eating.

  1. Look out for accidentally vegan foods 

There are so many everyday foods that just happen to be vegan, so open up your cupboard and take a look. Pasta, rice, peanut butter and Marmite, most breads, tinned tomatoes, chickpeas and kidney beans, jam and marmalade, coconut milk, curry pastes, tomato puree, baked beans, many crisps, crackers and biscuits, herbs and spices, many gravy granules, tea, coffee and fruit juice… There is a good chance that half the foods you already eat are vegan!

  1. Ease yourself in

There is no need to reinvent your whole eating habits. If you like a sausage sandwich, have one – just make sure the sausages are vegan. If you want ice cream, go ahead. There are dozens of different delicious flavours out there. You can have almost everything you had before in a vegan version, so just switch like for like.

  1. Veganise your favourite dishes 

Again, there is no need to adopt a whole new eating regime. If your signature dish is lasagne, make a vegan version with soya mince and plant milk for the béchamel. If you love a morning fry-up, you can make it with vegan bacon and sausages. Whether you cook curries, casseroles, soups, stews, pies and pasties, roast dinners, cakes, desserts or anything else, simply veganise it.

  1. When you’re ready, branch out 

Many people find that becoming vegan opens up a whole new world of recipes and ingredients, and rekindles their love of great food. Once you’ve got the hang of the basics, why not jump in and try some brand-new recipes (there are thousands online) and see if it ignites your culinary passions.

  1. Keep snacks to hand 

Don’t get caught out! It’s really easy to pick up vegan snacks in most places but not everywhere, so make sure you keep a bag of nuts, a chocolate bar or some fruit in your bag or car just in case.

  1. Persistence pays

Not every vegan product will work for you but just because the first cheese you try or the first latte you make doesn’t hit the spot, don’t rule out all other cheeses and plant milks. There are so many different ones to try – cream cheese, melty cheeses, nut-based, coconut-based, soya-based, all flavours and lots of different brands and styles; and as for milks, you’ll find oat, hemp, almond, coconut, rice and soya. Try them all, and you will soon find your perfect match.

  1. HappyCow

Like eating out? Download the HappyCow app onto your phone and let it guide you to your nearest restaurant, café or shop where you can find vegan food wherever you are in the world.

  1. Find your tribe 

It’s easy to feel isolated as a new vegan but there are millions of us out there. Find your local vegan meetup group and make like-minded friends in real life or search online for vegan groups that interest you. From vegan runners to bakers to knitters; from vegan weightlifters to fashionistas to activists. They’re all there waiting for you.

  1. Be kind to yourself  

Everyone makes mistakes. Whether you ate something non-vegan accidentally or simply gave in to temptation, it’s OK. It doesn’t mean you are no longer vegan; it just means you are human! Chalk it up to experience and move forward.

-Toni Vernelli from Veganuary

What mistakes should be avoided when transitioning to a vegan lifestyle? 

First things first – don’t be too hard on yourself. Some people find it easier than others to give up animal products completely from day 1, but others may go back to their normal eating habits from time to time, and both are ok; that’s just part of the process. Don’t beat yourself up for “not doing it right”.

Next, try to avoid vegan junk food. Most people think that just by being vegan, you’re automatically healthier, but that’s definitely not the case if your daily meals just consist of burgers and pizza. I highly recommend you do your research and have lots of healthy vegan recipes on hand to experiment with. Personally, I’m a fan of adding at least 50% raw food into your daily meals as that gives you lots more nutrition. Try dividing your plate in half – fill half your plate with something cooked and make the other half a salad.

Lastly, don’t worry about protein and calorie counting. It is very easy for a vegan diet to meet the recommendations for protein. In fact, vegetarians and vegans actually average 70% more protein than they need every day. Just make sure you have plenty of variety, listen to what your body needs (not craves!) and enjoy your food.

-Anya Andreeva, founder of Live Love Raw and author of “How To Be A Raw Foodie”.

 What recommendations can you give us to raise vegan children? 

Raising vegan children can come with a set of unique challenges for parents. Talking to children about veganism from an early age can be a daunting task. Especially as reasons for being vegan are not always kid-friendly. However, it’s important to be transparent with your child about why your family is vegan, even if it’s a little uncomfortable at first. There are a lot of resources out there from vegan children’s books to vegan subscription services like Vegancuts. After all, as a parent, you never want your child to feel like they are “missing out”. At Vegancuts we curate 100% vegan snack boxes each month to showcase the very best vegan products on the market. Embracing fun experiences like subscription boxes go a long way to ensuring your kids don’t feel “left out” – and who knows, it might even make their friends jealous!

-Jase Quelch, Vegancuts Content Manager

Why is it important for vegans to supplement with B12 vitamin? Why is this necessary? 

Vitamin B12 used to be found in the soil where we farm our food. But over the centuries of over-farming, our soil is mostly barren of naturally occurring B12, which leaves no plant-based sources of it (although it’s worth noting that B12 deficiency rates are about the same in both vegans and non-vegans alike). B12 is a very important vitamin, and deficiencies can have symptoms ranging from sluggishness all the way to irreversible brain damage! A deficiency can take years to develop, as we can store it in our livers for 3-7 years, so even if you haven’t supplemented for years and your blood tests are fine now, it doesn’t mean that they will be down the line. With vitamin B12 supplements being so affordable and readily available, there is no reason not to take the supplement and stay healthy — vegan or not.

– Dani Taylor, Vegan Strong Assistant Tour Director, Author, Vegan Strength Coach, and Natural Bodybuilding Athlete

As you can see, nowadays, you can find vegan options for almost everything you need to move forward to a fully vegan and cruelty-free lifestyle. As more of us choose this way of living, more products will be offered in the market to cover all the needs of this growing trend all over the world.

Originally posted on Porch.com

Don’t miss the Veggly Blog

So there you have it!

As Veggly grows further, make sure you subscribe to our blog and stay up to date with all of our announcements, other news stories, blog posts, and recipes.

Please follow Veggly across our social channels:

Instagram

Facebook

Twitter

LinkedIn

What are the benefits of being vegan for one year?

benefits of going vegan

Here are some benefits of being vegan and how we contribute to the lives of animals, the environment and our own health in the course of one year. 

The fundamental premise of veganism is to save animal lives, even if at a limited capacity. This means taking an ethical stance in favor of those who suffer throughout all levels of human consumption: food, clothing, accessories, cosmetics and events. In our daily lives, this seems like a long list of chores, but avoiding certain kinds of consumption is possible and can have many positive results. We become more aware and responsible with all forms of life. 

Animal exploitation lies at the center of a series of harmful consequences, like the violation of animal rights as sentient beings capable of feeling pain, fear and demonstrating happiness and love. The environmental devastation promotes climate changes, increased pollution, emission of greenhouse gases, expropriation of native people and the expulsion and death of animals in their natural habitats. For humans, animal consumption might also be unhealthy. 

“If anyone argued that discriminating and exploiting non-human animals is justified because they are less intelligent, or because we are stronger and more powerful, then we’d have to accept that this kind of exploitation may also be applied to humans who are weaker and less powerful. That would mean discriminating against members of our society who are too young, too old, too sick. Who would stand for that?” animal-ethics.org

Benefits

The benefits of being vegan are in three fundamental concepts for the harmony of life on Earth: preservation of the dignity and life of all animal species, including humans, environmental protection and health.  

How many lives can a vegan save in one year?

One vegan can save on average one animal per day and up to 582 animals per year. The author of this research is Harish Sethu, a professor at Drexel University in Philadelphia, US, a PhD in electrical engineering. This estimate was published by the website Counting Animals.

To reach this estimate, Harish used data about the amount of animals who were killed for food in the United States and population size. With most aquatic species being killed, the result was somewhere between 371 and 582 animals yearly.  

To achieve a more accurate number, he had to exclude vegetarians and vegans and divide the total number of killed animals exclusively between the meat-eating population. 

However, this research’s conclusion is fairly conservative, given that it doesn’t account for animals killed by the egg and dairy industries, which could make the figure even higher. It’s important to emphasize that the aquatic animals who are “accidentally” killed by the fishing industry, thousands of them, also don’t factor into this data. 

Still, vegans’ generous and compassionate ideals save hundreds of lives every year. 

Environment

According to a report about land use and climate change from the IPCC, an international panel that assists the UN, the scientis Marta G. Rivera Ferre explains how chicken and pork consumption currently represents 77% of animals raised to feed the world, and 22% is beef. 

Each of these species contributes to climate changes in a different way. The ruminantes emit methane gas with heating potencial 28 times bigger than CO2 and can stay in the atmosphere for up to ten years. Monogastric animals, which are no ruminant, emit nitrous oxide and CO2, which can stay in the atmosphere for up to 100 years. 

To the UN for the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), livestock is responsible for 18% of greenhouse gases, much more than all of the public transportation exhausts in the world. Including its by-products, livestock accounts for at leat 32 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) every year, that is, 51% of all global greenhouse gas emissions

Water resources, shallow or underground water available for all kinds of regional uses or water basins are also highly affected by livestock. Water consumption for animal agriculture varies between 33 and 75 trillion spent gallons annually. Only in the United States, agriculture is responsible for 80 to 90% of water consumption. 

According to Michael F. Jacobson, to the Center for Science in the Public Interest, feed production for livestock consumes 56% of water in the United States.

With livestock, there is excessive water spending across all of the industrial spectrum, whether it is for the production of eggs, dairy and leather, but also for the production of meat itself. In a conservative estimate, it take more than 2 thousand gallons of water to produce 2 pounds of beef, but this figure can go up to 4 thousand gallons. 

Animal consumption directly affects the environment. Water waste, deforestation and CO2 emissions.

What are the benefits of being vegan? In one year, one vegan can avoid the waste of: 

401,504 gallons of water
Deforestation of an area of 14,929 ft²
8,933 lbs of CO2 (cowspiracy.com/facts)

Health:

In a sociocultural and economic environment, with large scale publicity aimed towards influencing the consumption of products and, as consequence, diets, we grow up with the idea that we need animal products such as meat and milk to achieve good health and, many times, social status. However, a strictly vegetarian diet is filled with all the nutrients ouar bodies need and is scientifically proved to be effective in keeping the body healthy in any stage of a human being’s life. 


There are many studies which report of the benefits of being vegan and following a plant based diet. This kind of diet tends to offer more fibers, antioxidants, as well as being even richer in potassium, magnesium and vitamins A, C and E. 

According to the American Heart Association, this type of diet is also effective at preventing cardiac diseases. A study was carried out by the association with 100 participants with pre-existing heart conditions to rate the performance of heart functions for patients with omnivorous and vegetarian diets. The vegetarian diet was shown to significantly reduce systemic inflammation and improved the lypidic profiles for the patients, while this wasn’t the case for those with an omnivore diet. 

Among other benefits of being vegan is the potential to reduce risks for some types of cancer. Regularly eating vegetables may reduce the risk of cancer in 9 to 18%. Among the cancers that we can reduce the chances of risk, we have prostate cancer, colon cancer and breast cancer.

It can be observed that plant based living is not only healthy and diverse, but can also help is live better and longer.

#Govegan

Don’t miss the Veggly Blog

So there you have it!

As Veggly grows further, make sure you subscribe to our blog and stay up to date with all of our announcements, other news stories, blog posts, and recipes.

Please follow Veggly across our social channels:

Instagram

Facebook

Twitter

LinkedIn

Vegan Nutrition 101 for Fitness Enthusiasts

Check out these amazing tips and learn more about vegan nutrition

vegan nutrition

The fitness world is one that has long been dominated by people who advocate that eating animals is the best way to build muscle. Vegan nutrition is here to change this.

Although it is easy to buy into the science of why we should be eating meat if we want to bulk up, it is not necessarily true. Fortunately, this is a myth that is being increasingly debunked within the industry.

Thanks to plant-based fitness pioneers, such as Patrik Baboumian, Torre Washington, and Jon Venus, the idea of bodybuilding on a vegan diet is becoming much more widely accepted and understood.

“As a transgender vegan working within the fitness industry, I regularly come up against opinions and attitudes that conflict with my own lived experiences. When it comes to talking about vegan nutrition, this is a topic that I have found to be particularly delicate to navigate with clients and other professionals. The balance between offering the best-personalized advice that does not conflict with my beliefs has occasionally been a fine line to tread.”

Protein, Protein, Protein

The idea that we all need to be drastically increasing our protein intake to build muscle is one that I definitely feel has been slightly exaggerated. This is something that some people working within the industry are guilty of perpetuating, as well as those who seek to sell protein-packed products to fitness enthusiasts.

When you consider that the global protein powder industry is expected to be worth $30.5 billion by 2027, then it is not really difficult to understand why this marketing message is so commonplace.

The truth of the matter is that the average person who is not exercising will generally only need to consume 0.8g of protein per kilogram of bodyweight each day.

This amount should be increased if you are very active or consciously trying to build muscle and get stronger. Towards the highest end of the scale, a person who is going to the gym to lift weights regularly should eat as much as 2g of protein per kilogram of bodyweight every day.

So, what does this actually look like?

For me as someone who weighs 60kg, if I was not exercising, I would aim to consume 48g of protein a day.

Since I lift weights four to five times a week, I have increased this number to 1.5g per kg, which means I aim to get 90g of protein in my diet every day.

For me, this is not really an outrageous amount of protein, but will of course differ depending on how much you weigh.

By dividing this protein up with each meal throughout the day, you can ensure that it is always a manageable and reasonable amount to include.  

If you are wondering just how simple it is to get a decent amount of protein, consider as an example that just two tablespoons of peanut butter contains around 8g of protein, which is the same amount of protein you will get from a cup of quinoa.

For easy ways to add more plant-based protein to your diet, include:

  • Tofu
  • Seitan
  • Tempeh
  • Edamame
  • Lentils
  • Chickpeas
  • Nuts
  • Quinoa

You can also find fantastic vegan protein powders to supplement with a shake after every workout. I absolutely love the Huel Black Edition for this very reason, as it allows me to make sure I always have a decent dose of protein. Black Edition Huel has more protein and less carbs than the typical product, so it is perfect for building muscle.

What About Creatine?

Creatine is a supplement that is used to improve athletic performance. It has the potential to boost strength and promote muscle gain.

Dietary creatine is found almost exclusively in animal meat, so it is especially beneficial and advisable for vegan gym goers to supplement it. However, it should also be noted that creatine is actually present in very low levels in meat, and it is therefore advantageous for everyone to include it as a supplement.

More than 700 human studies have taken place to investigate the safety and efficacy of creatine, with results highlighting that it is both safe and effective.

So, how much creatine do you need?

Adding 5g of creatine to your diet every day is a universally decent amount. Personally, I make myself a litre bottle of orange squash every morning and add my creatine powder into that. I will then drink this throughout the morning before heading to the gym later in the day. You can also add your creatine to your protein shake, or simply to water.

In terms of timing, it does not really matter when you take your creatine as long as you aim for 5g every day.

A Varied and Balanced Diet for proper vegan nutrition

In order to reach your fitness goals in the gym, it is so important that you pay attention to what you are eating.

It is equally important to remember that following a vegan diet does not automatically mean you are always adhering to a healthy diet. This is such a common misconception due to some people with little experience of plant-based eating tending to have a distorted idea of what vegans actually eat.

Luckily for those of us with a sweet tooth, there is an endless range of vegan junk foods on the market today, such as ice cream, chocolate, sweets, ready meals, processed fast foods etc. While this is good news for our taste buds, it can make eating well all the more difficult because there is so much temptation.

Personally, I’ll choose chocolate over getting ripped abs any day. I believe it’s important to enjoy food and not to demonise specific food groups or choices. However, this is something that I understand I have to enjoy in moderation if I do not want to sabotage my training overall.

For those people who are looking to make a serious start with getting fit and working out, eating a diet that prioritises healthy foods is going to be a good move.

This means more plant-based proteins, more fresh fruit and vegetables, eating complex carbohydrates instead of simple ones, and eating healthy fats while avoiding saturated fats.

Nutrition can be a confusing topic to delve into, but it can be made simpler by choosing to eat foods that ARE ingredients, instead of eating foods that HAVE ingredients.

What do I mean by this?

Basically, any food item that you can enjoy in its whole form, such as fresh fruit, fresh veggies, grains, nuts, or seeds, is an ingredient. These are foods that we can generally all safely enjoy more of.

Foods that come in a packet with a long list of ingredients on the back are more likely to be high in calories, high in saturated fat, high in refined sugar, and also potentially packed full of any number of chemical additives that can cause chaos in the body.

Get Enough Calories

If you are following a healthy plant-based diet, then you might find that you do not always get enough daily calories to support your fitness goals. This is especially likely to be the case if you are following a low-carb plant-based diet.

When you are trying to build muscle then you will need to make sure you are eating enough. The specific number of calories that you need will depend on a number of different factors, such as your body composition, how active you are during each day, and how hard you are training.

Can an app help?

Using an app to track your food is certainly not for everyone and is something I would never recommend for people who have experienced disordered eating. However, for people who struggle to eat enough during the day, food tracking apps can help you to stay on top of this.

By tracking everything you eat, you can not only conquer your calorie needs, but also ensure you are getting the right mix of macronutrients (carbohydrates, fat, and protein).

I find that this is a helpful thing to do for a few days every month, just to make sure that food goals are more or less being achieved.

If you do not want to use an app to track your food, then you might try following a food plan that has been specifically designed for your individual requirements.

Getting Started

If you are recently getting started with a new gym regime or are keen to embark upon one, it is important to ease into it gently. Allow your body the time it needs to adapt to a new exercise plan and be sure to take adequate rest days in between workouts.

When it comes to your vegan nutrition, making small changes is always going to be much more sustainable than switching your entire diet all at once. So, evaluate your current eating habits and then begin with one positive change at a time.

“In terms of my own fitness journey as an ethical vegan, it was incredibly important to me to find ways to eat to support my fitness goals without compromising on my morals. Fortunately for me, and for everyone else who is vegan for the animals, it is actually quite easy to do this!”

Author bio

Alix Coe is a non-binary/trans-masc personal trainer working with the queer community globally. Alix is vegan for the animals, and they are excited to encourage body positivity, vegan nutrition and plant-based eating through their fitness work. Alix lives on their boat by the sea in Brighton, UK, with their gorgeous dog Lex.

To learn more about what they are up to, and vegan nutrition head to their website – www.coefitness.com.

3 Reasons why a Vegan Diet is the Perfect Choice for Earth Day

Start a Vegan Diet on Earth Day! That’s the best thing you can do for your planet!

Today is the most important Earth Day in history. As the climate and biodiversity crises worsen across the world, we face a turning point for humanity: we either take action and fix the situation together, or continue causing the problems that brought us here.

Vegan Diet on Earth Day

So what can we do as individuals to help? Of course, there are many ways. You can switch your energy provider to a renewable supplier, stop buying fast fashion clothing, make sure you don’t have any investments in fossil fuels, or even buy an electric car. But there’s one thing we can all do that makes a big impact across the world, and it starts with our food.

Cutting out animal products from your diet makes an incredible impact. Here’s three reasons why (backed by science).

1. A vegan diet is the ‘single biggest way’ to reduce your impact on Earth

The largest ever scientific analysis in history (from the University of Oxford) revealed the terrible carbon and land footprint of animal agriculture. It explained how animal farming provides just 18% of calories but takes up 83% of farmland globally. But that’s just the land use, the emissions are worse than previously thought.

The study, published in the Science (one of the world’s most respected scientific journals), showed how even the ‘lowest impact beef’ was still much more damaging to the atmosphere than any plant-based food.

Beef X Tofu On Greenhouse Gases Emission

2. A vegan diet requires much less land and frees up space for natural carbon capture (trees)

Nature Sustainability (another world-leading scientific journals) published a report last year showing the incredibly positive impact plant-based diets can have on climate change.

You can check out the abstract/summary below, but here’s a brief version and explanation we have prepared:

This study revealed the huge ‘carbon opportunity cost of keeping livestock’.

That means there is a huge amount of carbon from the atmosphere that land could draw down/capture (using trees/plants etc.) if it were not being used for animal farming/livestock production. It also means there is an ecological opportunity cost – for example: the woodlands, wetlands, wolves, wild herbivores and thriving ecosystems the land could support if it were rewilded and turned away from animal farming.

Carbon Opportunity Cost of Animal Sourced Food

But how do we put this into simple terms so I can explain this point to my friends, family and colleagues?

Here’s our effort:

The research shows us that it is far better to use land for plants (e.g. trees, grass, crops) to draw down carbon from the atmosphere, rather than farming animals for meat/dairy etc.

The impact we can have by switching our food production to vegan diets is even larger than previously thought. The report from Nature explains how a shift to vegan diets could enable us to draw down over 500 gigatons of CO2e*… that’s an amazing 500 billion tons! This would give us an excellent chance of limiting global warming to 1.5℃. This might be the strongest argument of all!

3. Vegan diets are essential to protect biodiversity

A new report from British think tank Chatham House found that vegan diets are the best way to protect biodiversity around the world.

The report, titled Food System Impacts on Biodiversity Loss, highlights how animal agriculture/farming is a dangerous threat to most species currently at risk of extinction.

Clearing land to create pastures for farmed animals is the main cause of habitat loss across the world. Right now, the majority of all our crops are grown just to feed farmed animals to create meat (despite many people starving in the world).

The report says that a shift towards plant-based meats and dairy alternatives will certainly help the situation and help protect our biodiversity. Farming crops/plants/vegetables instead of animals takes much fewer resources, and saves a huge amount of land and water.

The report estimates that if the world switched to a vegan diet, over 75 percent of the world’s cropland could be repurposed. Much of that land can be restored to nature, and would provide habitat for wildlife (helping protect and restore biodiversity). You can read the full report here.

As you can see, from an environmental point of view, there are many excellent arguments in favor of a vegan diet for earth! Of course, there are clearly many other great reasons to leave animals off your plate (animal welfare, food resources, health etc.), but this one is very important.

So next time someone challenges veganism and asks you to explain it all, make sure you have this blog and those facts at the ready!

How can Veggly help you?

That said, we hope you don’t have to explain veganism all the time and you can find someone who shares your love of animals and our planet! As you know, that’s why Veggly exists!

To see some of our success stories and messages from our users who found love from their Veg-Matches, please see this page here.

And if you’re reading this, we encourage you to participate in this year’s Earth Day and make a positive impact in whatever way you can.

Don’t miss the Veggly Blog

So there you have it!

As Veggly grows further, make sure you subscribe to our blog and stay up to date with all of our announcements, other news stories, blog posts, and recipes.

Please follow Veggly across our social channels:

Instagram

Facebook

Twitter

LinkedIn

* CO2e (carbon dioxide equivalent) is a unit for measuring carbon footprints. CO2e is used to express the impact of each different greenhouse gas in terms of the amount of CO2 that would create the same amount of global warming.

Why People Go Vegan?

Animal welfare tops the list, environment places second and health is third.

Why people go vegan?
The top reason for people making the switch to a vegan diet is animal welfare.

Veggly, the world’s leading dating app for vegans and vegetarians, has released new research revealing the top five reasons why people have chosen to go vegan.

Why people go vegan?

The survey of 8,500 vegans from across the world shows that the top reason for people making the switch to a vegan diet is animal welfare. Overall, 9 in 10 (89.1%) respondents indicated animal welfare was a key reason for cutting out animal products from their diet.

The second most popular reason was to protect the environment and combat climate change. Nearly two thirds of vegans (64.1%) listed environment as a motivating factor for making the switch to a vegan diet. This figure is likely to grow as the links between animal agriculture and climate change become more widely realised around the world.

The third most popular reason was health. Over half of vegans (53.16%) list health as a motivating factor for cutting out animal products from their lives. As strong evidence demonstrating the health benefits of vegan diets continues to build, this figure is also likely to grow.

Food conservation was the fourth most popular reason (15.9%) and cost/inexpensiveness of vegan diets was fifth most popular (6%).

Commenting on the research findings, Founder of Veggly, Alex Felipelli, said:

“There are many excellent reasons to go vegan, so we have found it fascinating to see which motivations are the most popular. We are very pleased to see animal welfare is number one as veganism ultimately gives a voice to the voiceless. At the same time, we can see both environmental and health reasons are strong factors as well. A vegan diet is clearly the best thing for the planet and your health, so it’s no surprise they are also popular reasons.”

Available throughout the world, Veggly is used in 181 countries. We have recently reached 1 million Veg-Matches.

Don’t miss the Veggly Blog

So there you have it!

As Veggly grows further, make sure you stay up to date and read some of our success stories and messages from our users who found love from their Veg-Matches – all on this page here.

Stay up to date with all of our announcements, other news stories, blog posts, and recipes. Please follow Veggly across our social channels:

Instagram

Facebook

Twitter

LinkedIn

Vegan Women Activists

The importance of women in the vegan movement

The social structure that has been in place throughout the ages, in the West as well as the East, has conditioned and defined women’s role in society. With no way to overcome the system of oppression, which was sometimes veiled and quite clear at others, a stereotypical sociocultural relation was imposed and has remained crystalized for centuries. Gender equality rights weren’t to be updated along with the chronological and social evolution of the communities. 

The feminine, in whichever body it can be identified in, has always been the object of a struggle. Women have had, and still do to this day, to fight against discrimination and to strengthen the acknowledgement of their rights which, up until the nineteenth century, was generically conditioned to domestic labour, a monastic life or to parties within a household setting. 

From the 20th century on, with the rise of vegan activism in the mid 1940’s, the already existing fight for rights joined forces with other types of liberation movements. The importance of women activists in the vegan movement is highlighted by personalities who played fundamental roles in the dissemination of Animal Rights.

Vegan women activists have become an inspiration for this movement which is, after all, intersectional. Veganism from a feminist standpoint has the freedom for the oppressed bodies of non-human and human animals as a basis. It aims to develop a more fair society: horizontal, egalitarian, ecological and with rights to land and a clean diet.  

Angela Davis

These precepts are often explained by activist and american scholar Angela Davis, who establishes a connection between Human Rights and Animal Rights. She is currently one of the most important personalities when it comes to explaining the intersectionality in veganism. Davis is also an emeritus teacher in the University of California, Santa Cruz. 

“Most people don’t think about the fact they’re eating animals. When they’re eating a steak or eating chicken, most people don’t think about the tremendous suffering that those animals endure simply to become food products to be consumed by human beings”, Davis said in 2012, during an interview with Grace Lee Boggs.

Vegan Women Activists – Angela Davis

Brigitte Bardot

One of the most famous and important actresses of her generation, at age 39, Brigitte Bardot began a new life as an Animal Rights activist. In 1973 when she was at the peak of her career, having acted in dozens of films, Bardot announced her retirement from the silver screen.

In an interview for the british newspaper The Guardian in July 2015, she said that when she found out the truth about animal exploitation, she realized that it would be obvious, and even imperative to end her career. In 1986, she auctioned off her goods to create the Fondation Brigitte Bardot for the well being and protection of animals. 

To the Daily Mail she said: “I’ve rescued stray dogs and cats my whole life, but when I started the foundation, my intention was already to do so much more than that. My goal is to protect every wild or and domestic animal in France and abroad. I started small. I had to learn all about animal protection, the laws, the organization of charity institutions, management and health and safety obligations.”

Vegan Women Activists – Brigitte Bardot

Greta Thunberg

At only 18 years old, activist Greta Thunberg has already been elected as a youth model by the animal rights organization PETA and Person of the Year by Time magazine. Famous around the globe for her climate activism, Greta is also a vegan and began protesting on her own in August 2018 outside of the Swedish parliament, where she demanded practical action in response to climate change. 

Since then, she has motivated millions of children from several different countries to join her in the School Strike for Climate. In a strong, blunt speech in the UN Climate Action Committee in New York in 2019, she said: “You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words” – “People are suffering. People are dying; entire ecosystems are collapsing. We are in the beginning of a mass extinction and all you can talk about is money and fairytales and economic growth. How dare you?”

Vegan Women Activists – Greta Thunberg

Ingrid Newkirk

With great representation to the progression of animal liberation, Ingrid Newkirk is the president of the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), the biggest Animal Rights organization in the world. Ingrid says she strongly believes animals shouldn’t be used for food, turned into clothes, experimented on or used for human entertainment. In her new book, “Animalkind”, she explores the ways in which humans can better demonstrate their compassion for other species. 

“The goal of this movement [animal rights] is to make people acknowledge that, the same way animals aren’t hamburgers, they are handbags wither”, she wrote for PETA in 2016. “They are not test tubes with whiskers, they aren’t cheap alarms to avoid robbery, they are accessories, they aren’t pests. They are individuals and we must protect all of them.” 

Vegan Women Activists – Ingrid Newkirk

Jane Velez-Mitchell

Currently hosting a vegetarian cooking show called “New Day, New Chef”, on Amazon Prime, the former CNN news anchor and best-selling author Jane Velez-Mitchell is the founder of Jane UnChained News, a social media news channel that produces original content about animal rights activism and veganism. Jane has received several awards, including four Genesis Awards from the Humane Society in the United States for her coverage of animal issues. 

In a 2018 Animal Rights conference she has said: “Your phone is your best tool. You have an entire network, a TV studio, satellites, all of that in your back pocket or your purse. Use it for the animals.” “

Vegan Women Activists – Jane Velez-Mitchell

Leah Garcés

The Animal Rights organization Mercy for Animals also has a female president. With almost 20 years of leadership experience working in the animal protection movement, Leag Garcés wrote the book “Grilled: turning adversaries into allies to change the chicken industry”. It is in some parts a memoir and in others an account of her experiences from her work in the industry.

Melanie Joy, a social psychologist has said: “Grilled is absorbing, intriguing and moving. It will open your eyes and hearts to the animals’ situation within the american food system.”

Vegan Women Activists – Leah Garcés

Carol J. Adams

A woman who has been changing the way thousands of people see the world is the american feminist author and Animal Rights advocate, Carol J. Adams, with her famous and necessary book, “The sexual politics of meat: a feminist-vegetarian critical theory”. The book contains plenty of solid and consistent arguments, explains the close relation between male dominance, cultural violence against women and the act of eating meat. A must-read to reflect upon the relations between men, women and animals in the fight for and oppression free world. “Meat is a social construct made to seem natural and inevitable.” 

Vegan Women Activists – Carol J. Adams

Rooney Mara

Actress and stylist Rooney Mara is an Animal Rights activist. In 2019, the joined Animal Equality during the secret investigation of two factory farms, from which the footage obtained was released in an exposition called “With My Own Eyes”. 

She said of the occasion: “Even though I’ve seen many of these kinds of documentaries, I”d also like to see for myself and I hope to do something that can impact people to change their minds as well.”

Rooney often participates in demonstrations in favor of Animal Rights with her partner, the actor Joaquin Phoenix.

Vegan Women Activists – Rooney Mara

In this journey towards a more compassionate world defended by women, the animal cause gains strength in different spheres of society, through the political, literary and artistic fields. 

It’s noteworthy how plurally veganism is treated and approached, because that opens doors to questions so dormant in the cultural context we are living in and attempts to stop the discompass between all living beings and Nature.

As with the amazing women being highlighted today, there are still dozens of others in social media profiles exposing the terrible mistreatment of animals, as well as dozens of anonymous protectors who rescue stray animals and accomplish exceptional work..

This 8th of March, Women’s International Day, we honor the importance of all women in the vegan movement. 

Don’t miss the Veggly Blog

So there you have it!

As Veggly grows further, make sure you stay up to date and read some of our success stories and messages from our users who found love from their Veg-Matches – all on this page here.

And to stay up to date with all of our announcements, other news stories, blog posts, and recipes, please follow Veggly across our social channels:

Instagram

Facebook

Twitter

LinkedIn

Veggly Reaches New Milestone: 1 Million Veg-Matches

We are happy to announce we’ve reached 1 million Veg-Matches in the app! That’s 1 millions veggie connections that were made possible by Veggly and that makes us very happy! 🌱😊

The world’s number 1 dating app for vegans and vegetarians witnesses 12x growth in just 18 months. We now have over 300,000 users around the world. Not on Veggly yet? Install now. The next Veg-Match could be yours. Got a single vegan or vegetarian friend? Help them out by letting them know about Veggly! 😉

Veggly Reaches 1 Million Veg-Matches

More exciting news for vegans looking for love today! We are very pleased to announce that as the world’s leading dating app for vegans and vegetarians, we now have over 300,000 users around the world.

Since July 2019, the Veggly has grown in user numbers by a factor of 12, from 25,000 users. At the same time, we are also celebrating over 1 million ‘Veg-Matches’ (where two users match with each other) and we predict over 2 million by mid 2021. There has never been a better time for vegan and veggie love!

Overall, the United States now has the highest number of Veggly users in one country, with 47,823. Brazil (46,620 users) is second, Germany (39,703 users) is third, and the UK (35,190 users) is fourth. Spain is fifth, with 14,136 users.

To celebrate hitting the 300,000 user mark and 1 million Veg-Matches, we have launched two new initiatives:

1 Million Veg-Matches and Success Stories

A new series of blog posts sharing heart-warming success stories of couples who met on Veggly, starting with Charity and Joe (who met despite living in different countries: the Netherlands and UK)

Free ‘Veglentine’ coins

We celebrated ‘Veglentine’s Day’ by giving free coins (credits) to new and existing users. More to come soon!

Commenting on the new user milestone, our Founder, Alex Felipelli, said: “The growth we’ve seen is incredible! As veganism continues to surge in popularity across the world, so does the demand for herbivorous dating and relationships. So many of us want to be with someone who shares the same values and love for animals, so it’s no surprise we have hit the 300,000 user mark so quickly.

“This milestone will strengthen our commitment helping this community grow as much as possible. Especially as it was Valentine’s Day last week, we will do our best to make sure every herbivore on our app finds their ‘Veglentine’ this year.”

Available throughout the world (used in 181 countries), we are now set to continue our rapid growth thanks to a growing army of vegan volunteers around the world who have worked together to translate the app into Spanish, German, Portuguese, French, Italian, Danish and Polish, with many more languages, including Korean, on the way.

Don’t miss a thing about Veggly 🌱

Make sure to subscribe to our blog.

And stay up to date with all of our announcements, more news stories, blog posts, and future partnerships, please follow our social channels:

Instagram

Facebook

Twitter

LinkedIn

9 Practical Vegan Lunch Box Ideas

Vegan Lunch Box Ideas? Read on for 9 Practical ones and help your kids eat well while preserving the environment and saving the animals.

Practical Vegan Lunch Box Ideas

A number of the world’s population have adopted veganism. Their reasons vary, from concerns about their health, protecting the environment, and not harming the animals.

As it mentions in ParentalQuestions, diet is an important part of the growth for children of all ages. And the importance of vegetables for our health is huge!

Even after taking all animal foods off the table, including eggs, milk, cheese, and honey, sometimes this may leave you worried about what you will include in your kids’ lunch box. Kids’ meals should never be bland.

It’s tricky to prepare a lunch that will excite them to eat. One trick that we use is to pick up a Play Kitchen. This gives your little one the opportunity to play and cook alongside you and helps ease them into the concept of veganism.

Without further ado, let’s jump into the top 9 vegan lunch box ideas that are easy to prepare and interestingly tasty.

9 Practical Vegan Lunch Box Ideas

  1. Vegan Tofu Burgers

All kids get excited with burgers. Tofu burgers are quick and easy to make. Additionally, wheat germ, diced onion, and green onion garlic powder provide good nutrition to fuel kids’ bodies. You should definitely try out this recipe.

  1. Vegan Fried Rice

This meal will ravish your kid’s Chinese food craving. The vegan fried rice recipe is light and so tasty. Its ingredients are easy to get and will only take you less than 20 minutes to prepare. Kids can enjoy this meal alongside vegan spring rolls.

  1. Vegan Lunch Box Sandwiches!

Sandwiches have never been a boring lunch option. You can easily create any classic sandwich kids will love. 

The trick is never to make them too soggy and always let the young ones choose their vegan fillings. Always vary the sandwiches. Occasionally use wraps, bagels, and rolls in place of bread.

The chickpea-kale spread sandwich will get your kid anxious for lunchtime. It’s advisable to include a snack in their lunchbox. Fruits are a perfect combination alongside sandwiches.

  1. Thai Broccoli Salad + Peanut Dressing

Gather all the ingredients for this healthy gluten-free meal. For the peanut dressing, blend all the ingredients and add 3 tablespoons of water. The dressing shouldn’t be thick. 

Prepare the broccoli by boiling for approximately 3 minutes till they turn to a bright green. Stir the water and add shredded cabbage, scallions cilantro to the ready broccoli in a clean jar. 

Easy-peasy right? This super healthy and delicious broccoli salad can fit into your kids’ lunch schedule with the right ingredients.

  1. Spicy-Vegan Oaxacan Bowl

This Mexican-styled meal will definitely become your kid’s favorite meal. Top it with crunchy cabbage slaw, avocado toasted chipotle, and they will love it even more.

  1. Vegan Corn Chowder

The aroma of soup is always enticing. Vegan corn chowder soup will easily become your kid’s and home favorite soup. With veggies and few spices, you will have a delicious creamy texture the kids can pair with anything for lunch.

  1. Kale Quinoa Salad

Quinoa is definitely one of the most nutritious foods. These two superfoods will leave your kids energized and satisfied. The salad in the quinoa makes it solid enough to be a complete meal.

  1. ‘’Noodle It Up!’’

If your kids love noodles, you are in luck because there are many vegan options for you. 

Noodles are so easy to prepare, especially on a tight schedule. Garlic sesame noodles and Jade noodles are so versatile, loaded with lots of veggies, and useful.

  1. Zucchini Soup

This one has more calories than the time it takes to be ready. In less than 30 minutes, this sweet-scented soup loaded with healthy veggies will be ready. Serve zucchini soup with some crusty bread, and your kid will have a complete lunch.

Bonus Idea: Crunchy Baked Granola Bars

These are the flawless bars kids should have in their lunchboxes. They are a healthy dessert kind of meal but can work as a snack during lunch. They are easy to bake, needing only less than 10 ingredients

Focus on meals that kids will have no trouble finishing and what they like the most. Packing a treat and funny notes in the lunch box will always motivate kids to finish their meals. Having many choices will just work out for you. The above 9 vegan lunch box ideas, and a bonus recipe, should keep the ball rolling for you.

Check out how to properly prepare vegetables and some of our other vegan recipes.

Don’t miss the Veggly Blog

So there you have it! 9 Practical Vegan Lunch Box Ideas plus a bonus one 🙂

Make sure to subscribe to our blog.

And to stay up to date with all of our announcements, other news stories, blog posts, and recipes, please follow Veggly across our social channels:

Instagram

Facebook

Twitter

LinkedIn

How to Properly Prepare Vegetables?

What’s the right way to chop and prepare vegetables and fruits to get the most from them? In this article, we give great tips on how to prepare vegetables for your vegan recipes.

There are a many reasons to go vegan or at least include more vegetables in your plate, including animal welfare, environment conservation, health and even sexual performance.

Couple Prepare Vegetables

Prepare Vegetables In Advance With Your Veg-Match

Home-cooked meals are fast becoming a luxury, with a study published in the Nutrition Journal showing that while in 1965, up to 95% of meals were prepared at home, by the start of the new millennium, only 72% of people were doing so.

The shift in gender roles, rising housing prices, and the need to pay off student loans are just a few reasons for this phenomenon, although any vegan will tell you that time management is key to enjoying healthy meals regularly. Of course, if you are busy, then you may struggle to come up with varied enough meals throughout the week.

By prepping vegetables the right way, you can ensure your produce retains the maximum amount of nutrients and remains in the best possible state for your vegan sautés, sandwiches, wraps, snacks and soups. By preparing your vegetables together, the process can be as much an opportunity for romantic connection as the meals themselves.

Don’t have a Veg-Match yet? Get Veggly and find yours now!

Investing In Quality Equipment

If you are vegan, then your shopping cart probably wields a host of colorful vegetables of all shapes, textures and sizes.

When prepping this produce, it is important to use the right utensils, since your slices or pieces should be uniform to ensure even cooking.

You should have a very sharp knife for shredding leafy vegetables like cabbage and lettuce, as well as good peelers and graters.

There are many fancy electric tools around that shred, slice and dice, but if you have a small kitchen, simply have a good set of knives for small, medium and larger vegetables will most probably suffice.

Wrapping Chopped Vegetables In Plastic

If you are concerned about the possible loss of nutritional value caused by cutting and prepping vegetables beforehand, know that there are good ways to slow down nutritional loss.

As stated by Dr. A Kader of the University of California at Davis, by wrapping cut produce in plastic, you can reduce nutritional loss to about 10% for Vitamin C, 7% for folate, and just 3% for beta carotene.

Keep the vegetables in your fridge, and keep them in airtight containers. Buy fresh, seasonal vegetables if possible so you consume food with the maximum possible nutritional content.

Choose The Right Vegetables To Prepare

Some vegetables – including broccoli and cauliflower, asparagus, green beans, celery, sweet potatoes, winter squash and zucchini – can last in an airtight container in the fridge four around three days.

Others – including eggplant, potato and avocado – oxidize, and are better prepped on the same day they will be cooked.

There are also specific hacks that work well for some vegetables. For instance, you can prepare potatoes a day in advance, placing them in a bowl of water and popping them in the fridge.

Freezing Vegetables

You may buy an extra large batch of vegetables that the two of you won’t be able to consume in a few days. If so, freezing is a good way to save your purchases. 

Those vegetables that freeze particularly well include peas, broccoli, green beans, squash and cauliflower. Greens like spinach also retain their texture when frozen, as do herbs.

Avoid freezing vegetables with a high moisture content (including lettuce, mushrooms, and cucumbers) as they can freeze up then take on a mushy texture when thawed.

If you are excited about prepping your vegetables for beautiful vegan meals with your partner, ensure you save as much money as you can.

You can achieve this! Freeze excess produce and prepare vegetables all at once so you are more likely to use them over the next few days. For freezing, concentrate on low-moisture vegetables, planning meals in such a way that you utilize high-moisture produce first.

Don’t miss the Veggly Blog

So there you have it! There’s no excuse not to prepare vegetables for your next date! 🙂

As Veggly grows further, make sure you stay up to date and read some of our success stories and messages from our users who found love from their Veg-Matches – all on this page here.

And to stay up to date with all of our announcements, other news stories, blog posts, and recipes, please follow Veggly across our social channels:

Instagram

Facebook

Twitter

LinkedIn

Vegan Sexual Performance: 67% report a boost after making the switch

In this article, we reveal our latest research showing how two-thirds of vegans report an increase in sexual performance and enjoyment since switching to a vegan diet.

Vegan sexual performance

Very exciting news for vegans today! Especially when it comes to life in the bedroom! We’ve released new data from a survey of 5,000 vegans across the world revealing how making the switch to a plant-based diet has impacted their sexual enjoyment and performance. The results are worth celebrating!

The research shows that over two thirds of vegans (67%) have experienced a noticeable increase in sexual performance and enjoyment after making the switch to a vegan diet.

In particular, vegan men were most likely to notice a difference. 7 in 10 (71%) vegan men reported a boost, in contrast to 59% of vegan women.

The new findings are consistent with arguments made in The Game Changers by Dr. Aaron Spitz who witnessed a significant boost in strength and duration of erections for male athletes who took part in a controlled test to measure the impact of a vegan diet.

We believe these findings are likely to contribute further to the continued rise of veganism and plant-based diets across the globe.

This excellent growth has helped fuel our own growth in users. We now have over 290,000 users around the world. Find your Veg-Match today!

Commenting on the new research findings, our founder, Alex Felipelli, said: “This is exciting news for vegans and anyone considering a switch to a vegan diet! It’s yet another excellent reason for ditching animal products and choosing vegan food at every meal. It’s clear that your diet can impact life in the bedroom!”

So there you have it! If this doesn’t convince non-vegans, what will?!

As we grow further, make sure you stay up to date and read some of our success stories and messages from our users who found love from their Veg-Matches – all on this page here.

And to stay up to date with all of our announcements, other news stories, blog posts, and future partnerships, please follow the growth of Veggly across our social channels:

Instagram

Facebook

Twitter

LinkedIn